Common Words in Clinical Tools CME Courses

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The following table contains words that are common in Clinical Tools' CME courses, as well as notes on their usage. Most of the notes refer to the American Medical Association (AMA) or Merriam Webster (M-W), though a few refer to AP, Gregg, and NIH (legacy references).

Word Notes
anti-smoking This is normally not hyphenated, per the AMA, but we think the hyphenation looks better.
anti-tobacco This is normally not hyphenated, per the AMA, but we think the hyphenation looks better and it coincides with pro-tobacco (which, without the hyphen, could look like "proto-").
childcare This could be two words, but we use one since that is similar to "healthcare."
co-manage This is normally not hyphenated, per M-W, but we think the hyphenation is clearer.
co-occur This is hyphenated, per M-W.
e-mail This is hyphenated, per M-W. The "e" is not capitalized.
ex-smoker This is hyphenated, per the AMA.
follow-up This is hyphenated when a noun or adjective and not hyphenated (two words) when a verb.
healthcare This is written as one word without hyphens.
hotline This is written as one word without hyphens, per M-W.
life-threatening This is hyphenated.
mid-30s (referring to age) This is not hyphenated per the AMA, but we think the hyphenation looks better.
non–drug-using This hyphenation follows AMA. Note the en dash, followed by the regular hyphen.
non-injecting This is not hyphenated, per the AMA, but we think the hyphenation looks better. We realize that this is inconsistent with the next entry (nonsmoker/nonsmoking), but we think the word is harder to read without the hyphen.
nonsmoker, nonsmoking This is not hyphenated, per the AMA.
over-generalization There is no hyphen, per the AMA, but we think the hyphenation looks better.
pre-contemplation There is no hyphen, per the AMA, but this technical usage is taken from an author.
pre-existing This is hyphenated, per the AMA.
problem solving This is hyphenated as an adjective, if it precedes the noun it modifies; as a noun, it is not normally hyphenated ("problem-solving abilities" vs. "an exercise in problem solving").
re-evaluate This is hyphenated, per the AMA.
smoke-free This is hyphenated, per Gregg.
tobacco-free This is hyphenated, per Gregg.
toward (rather than "towards") This is the preferred usage, per Gregg and AP.
US This is written as one word, per the AMA. Do not use periods. Do not use "US" when the name stands alone; use it only as an adjective.
Web This is capitalized, per AMA.
Web page This is two words, per AMA.
website This is one word, per the NIH.